News Overview 2017

France Approaches an Important Election

A threat to European unity, populist movements are growing stronger in many European countries. Just how strong these movements are will become much clearer following this year's elections. What will the democratic camp in France do to counteract the populists? Journalist Michaela Wiegel, who has observed our neighbors for many years as a correspondent in Paris, shares her thoughts in an interview.
Philipp Knichel | March 2017
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Photo: Philipp Knichel
Nationalist movements in many European countries are threatening Europe’s open society and unity. With the upcoming elections in France, Germany, and the Netherlands, they could gain further influence. Journalist and France expert Michaela Wiegel is therefore calling for a more substantive dispute with populists: instead of arguing merely at the moral level, the negative effects of nationalist policies need to be highlighted and explained. Wiegel has been reporting from Paris for nearly 20 years as a correspondent for FAZ and is regarded as an expert on German-French relations. In the interview, she explains why the French are disappointed in the EU, though many still stand for European values.

Michaela Wiegel held this year’s Elysée lecture at Stuttgart’s municipal library. With the Elysée lecture, the Robert Bosch Foundation annually commemorates the signing of the German-French Friendship Treaty in cooperation with the IZKT (international center for culture and technology research) and the DVA-Stiftung.
 

Listen to the interview (in German)

An Evening Dedicated to German-French Friendship

Michaela Wiegel held this year’s Elysée lecture at Stuttgart’s municipal library. With the Elysée lecture, the Robert Bosch Foundation annually commemorates the signing of the German-French Friendship Treaty in cooperation with the IZKT (international center for culture and technology research) and the DVA-Stiftung.

Supporting German-French Dialog

DVA-Stiftung promotes the intensification of German-French dialog in the humanities and social sciences, as well as in literature and theater. This focus stems back to Robert Bosch, who strove to achieve reconciliation and friendship between Germany and France in the wake of the experiences of the First World War.